Close Search

Italian

Skip Navigation Links

Exam Board and Specification Codes: Edexcel (9IN0)

Italy has a rich cultural heritage and is a world leader in literature, architecture, painting, sculpture and music.

A-Level Italian can be an asset for students wishing to pursue a career in art and fashion as well as many areas of business. 

With stiff competition for university places, it is a great advantage to students to have a foreign language qualification, even if they are not applying for a language degree. A multilingual ability indicates openness to diversity and improves communication and decision-making skills.


What is covered by the course?

Year 1

The course is structured in two engaging themes. 

Component 1 - Evolving society in Italy 

Set in the context of Italy only, this theme covers social issues and trends: 

  • Changes in family structures (Modern Italian family, family structures, marriage vs civil partnership, mammoni (mummy’s boys)) 
  • Education (Italian education system, students’ problems, brain drain) 
  • The world of work (gender equality, unemployment, new models of work) 

Component 2 - Cultural heritage in the Italian-speaking countries and communities 

  • Set in the context of any Italian-speaking country/countries and/or community/communities, this theme covers artistic and political culture: 
  • music (developments and changes, impact on the popular culture) 
  • media (freedom of expression, the online and printed press, the impact on society and politics) 
  • cultural heritage (festivals and traditions) 
Year 2 

The course covers two more themes, studied alongside a literary text and a film. 

Component 3 - Italy, an evolving society 

Set in the context of Italy only, this theme covers social issues and trends: 

  • Positive impact of immigration on Italian society (the contribution of immigrants to Italian society and economy) 
  • Problems of migration in Italy (marginalisation and alienation; integration, the impact of immigration) 
  • North /South Divide (movement from South to North, the role of Italian industries, socio-economic differences between North and South, organised crime) 

Component 4 - Facism 

Set in the context of Italy only, this theme covers political culture and focuses on an important period of the Italian history: 

  • The rise of Mussolini (the birth and rise of Fascism in Italy) 
  • Fascism in WW2 (Mussolini’s government, the dictatorship; life under Mussolini) 
  • From dictatorship to democracy (the fall of Mussolini, Liberation, 6 nations) 

How is it examined?

There are three exams. All exams test pupils’ competency with respect to the topics you have learnt. 

Paper 1 - Listening, Reading and translation into English (2 hours) 

  • This paper tests students’ listening comprehension skills, ability to read and respond to a variety of texts 
  • 40% of the A level 

Paper 2 - Written response to works and translation into Italian (2 hours 40 minutes) 

  • written essay about a book (‘Io non ho paura’ by Niccolò Ammaniti) and another one about a film (‘La vita è bella’ by Roberto Benigni) and translation from English into Italian 
  • 30% of the A level 

Paper 3 - Speaking (20 minutes) 

  • It is an oral exam is assessed via two distinct tasks conducted entirely in Italian 
  • Task 1 is based on any of the sub-themes studied during the two-year course 
  • Task 2 is based on a presentation and discussion of a student’s independent research project 
  • 30% of the A level 

Related university courses & careers?

Any university course is well-suited to A-Level Italian. It is particularly relevant to students wishing to pursue a career in the art, fashion or business sectors. 

Employers value language skills for their potential to open up new markets and the ability to communicate with foreign customers and clients. Learning a new language, like Italian, also improves employment opportunities for those wishing to work abroad. 


Suggested literature & resources 

Students are recommended to read and listen to any materials and topics that interest them in Italian: newspapers, magazines, blogs, cartoons, films and songs, as well as language websites or applications. Students are recommended to read and listen to any materials and topics that interest them in Italian: newspapers, magazines, blogs, cartoons, films and songs, language websites 

Literary texts 

‘Io non ho paura’ by Niccolò Ammaniti (2001, novel) 
‘Il giorno della civetta’ by Leonardo Sciascia (1961, novel) 
‘Jack Frusciante è uscito dal gruppo’ by Enrico Brizzi (1994, novel) 
‘Lessico famigliare’ by Natalia Ginzburg (1963, novel) 
‘Marcovaldo’ by Italo Calvino (1963, short stories) 
‘Sei personaggi in cerca d'autore’ by Luigi Pirandello (1921, play) 
‘Senza sangue’ by Alessandro Baricco (2002, novel) 
‘Volevo i pantaloni’ by Lara Cardella (1989, novel) 

Films 

‘I cento passi’ by Marco Tullio Giordana (2000) 
‘Il Postino’ by Michael Radford (1994) 
‘La grande bellezza’ by Paolo Sorrentino (2013) 
‘La vita è bella’ by Roberto Benigni (1997) 
‘Nuovo cinema paradiso’ by Giuseppe Tornatore (1988) 
‘Va’ dove ti porta il cuore’ by Cristina Comencini (1996) 

To practice grammar and vocabulary 

‘Parola per parola’ by Tony Giovannazzi 
‘In bocca al lupo’ by Silvia Bertoni 
‘Gramm.it for English speakers’ by G. Iacovoni, N. Persiani, and B. Fiorentino 


Lower School

Kensington Park School (Years 7-11),
40-44 Bark Place,
London,
W2 4AT

Tel: +44 (0)20 7616 4400


Sixth Form

Kensington Park School Sixth Form,
59 Queen's Gate,
South Kensington, London,
SW7 5JP, UK

Tel: +44 (0)20 7225 0577


© Kensington Park School
All rights reserved

Privacy Policy
Sitemap
Site by Blue Level